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Monday, July 27, 2020 | History

2 edition of Wetland soils and vegetation, Arctic Foothills, Alaska found in the catalog.

Wetland soils and vegetation, Arctic Foothills, Alaska

Marilyn Walker

Wetland soils and vegetation, Arctic Foothills, Alaska

by Marilyn Walker

  • 278 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, Research and Development in Washington, DC .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Wetlands -- Alaska -- North Slope -- Classification,
  • Hydromorphic soils -- Alaska -- North Slope -- Identification,
  • Plant-soil relationships -- Alaska -- North Slope,
  • Wetland plants -- Alaska -- North Slope

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Marilyn D. Walker, Donald A. Walker, and Kaye R. Everett
    SeriesBiological report -- 89(7), Biological report (Washington, D.C.) -- 89-7
    ContributionsWalker, D. A., Everett, K. R, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Research and Development, Walker Geobotanical Surveys
    The Physical Object
    Paginationix, 89 p. :
    Number of Pages89
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13566137M

      Observations in Arctic Canada and Alaska indicate that annual evaporation from lakes and wetlands exceeds annual precipitation (Roulet and Woo ; Marsh and Bigras ; Rovansek et al. ; Mendez et al. ).Rovansek et al. () found that evaporation is the major cause of the observed drop in pond water levels during the snow-free period for a tundra wetland complex in northern Alaska. Setting. This ecoregion is located on the north coast of Alaska, and includes the east coast plain of Banks Island, as well as the Anderson River and Horton River plains, and the Tuktoyaktuk coast in the Northwest is an area of low, flat, boggy coastal plains. The underlying soil of this damp Arctic coast is thick, solid permafrost, covered in summer with thermokarst "thaw.

    Low Arctic Thermokarst Failures. Arctic warming will promote permafrost degradation and thaw. Formerly frozen soils may be further destabilized by increased precipitation, leading to hillslope thermokarst failures. Thermokarst failures are abundant and appear to have become more numerous around Toolik Lake on the eastern North Slope and in the western Noatak River basin in Alaska. Arctic Vegetation Plots at Imnavait Creek, Alaska, This dataset provides environmental, soil, and vegetation data collected during the periods of August and August-September from 84 study plots at the Imnavait Creek research site.

    @article{osti_, title = {Diurnal and seasonal patterns of ecosystem CO{sub 2} efflux from upland tundra in the foothills of the Brooks Range, Alaska, U.S.A.}, author = {Oberbauer, S F and Gillespie, C T and Cheng, Weixin}, abstractNote = {Carbon dioxide efflux and soil microenvironment were measured in three upland tundra communities in the foothills of the Brooks Range in arctic Alaska. of wetland plants (hydrophytes) or (2) the presence of wet soils (hydric soils) or (3) soil saturation or flooding. Wetlands are naturally extremely diverse and complex. The wetlands classification system presents a method for grouping ecologically similar wetlands.


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Wetland soils and vegetation, Arctic Foothills, Alaska by Marilyn Walker Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Wetland soils and vegetation, Arctic Foothills, Alaska. [Marilyn Walker; D A Walker; K R Everett; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Region 8. @article{osti_, title = {Wetland soils and vegetation, Arctic Foothills, Alaska}, author = {Walker, M D and Walker, D A and Everett, K R}, abstractNote = {This report is one of a series sponsored by the FWS to examine relationships between wetland plants and soils in a variety of habitats.

It examines a first order watershed in the Arctic Foothills of the Brooks Range, northern Alaska. Wetland Soils and Vegetation, Arctic Foothills, Alaska It examines a first order watershed in the Arctic Foothills of the Brooks Range, northern Alaska, which is representative of similarly.

Author of Harvesting the northern wild, Vegetation and floristics of pingos, Central Arctic Coastal Plain, Alaska, Wetland soils and vegetation, Arctic Foothills, Alaska.

The Imnavait Creek watershed is located on the North Slope of Alaska, at the foothills of the Brooks Range (68 o 37'N, Walker, M.D., D.A.

Walker and K.R. Everett. Wetland soils and vegetation, Arctic Foothills, Alaska. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Alaska book Biological Report 89(7), 89 p.

Imnavait Basin data Updated 02/ Imnavait Ridge data. This dataset is a summary of environmental, soil, and vegetation information collected from 84 study plots near Imnavait Creek, Alaska. Imnavait Creek is situated in a shallow basin at the foothills of the central Brooks Range and the Imnavait Creek vegetation area is located near the center of the Upper Kuparuk River region and encloses a km 2 area northeast of Toolik Lake, close to the.

The Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research conducts interdisciplinary research in earth system science and climate dynamics to better understand past, present, and future change in high-latitude, alpine, and global environments.

Litaor, M. Reply to "Comments on the influence of eolian dust on alpine soils". Soil Science Society of America Journal, 52(1): Litaor, M. Review of soil solution samplers. Water Resources Research, 24(5): The Arctic Foothills Tundra forms a transition between the flat, low-lying Arctic Coastal Tundra to the north and the steep mountainous Brooks/British Range Tundra to the south.

It is a series of rounded hills and plateaus which coverskm2 and stretches from the Chukchi Sea east across northern Alaska to the Yukon border. The Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska is a unique ecoregion with abundant freshwater resources bounded to the north by the Arctic Ocean and to the south by the foothills of the Brooks Range.

Wetlands are ubiquitous on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska because the permafrost layer inhibits drainage leading to saturated soils. Both migratory. All - AGC Reports and Proposals - Articles and Books - Conference Proceedings. Reports and Proposals. Walker, D.A. Infrastructure-Thermokarst-Soil-Vegetation Interactions at Lake Colleen Site A, Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

Wetland soils and vegetation, Arctic Foothills, Alaska. Biological Report. 7(89), All of the land burned in the AR fire is in the foothills region of the North Slope, including diverse tundra, streams, lakes, and wetlands at elevations of m.

The dominant vegetation is moist acidic tundra, characterized by the tussock-forming sedge Eriophorum vaginatum (Walker et al. ). ters). All soils, except for a few south-facing slopes, are underlain by permafrost.

Wildfire is common. The Brooks Range is the main divide between the Arctic and Interior Alaska, and vegetation on either side of the range reflects this.

Valleys and lower mountain slopes on the north side of the range are Table 2. Brooks Foothills land status. PLANTS Web site. It has a distribution from Greenland to Alaska south to North Carolina, Kansas, and California.

Habitat: Bluejoint survives best in moist to saturated soils, but not soils inundated by water. The species has an extremely broad distribution and a wide ecological amplitude occurring in diverse wetland areas.

Adaptation. ORNL DAAC: This dataset provides environmental, soil, and vegetation data collected during the periods of August and August-September from 84 study plots at the Imnavait Creek research site. Imnavait Creek is located in a shallow basin at the foothills of the central Brooks Range.

Data includes the baseline plot information for vegetation, soils, and site factors for the study plots. Traduit pour la revue Arctic par Nicole Giguere. INTRODUCTION The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Wetlands Delineation Manual (Environmental Laboratory, ), hereafter referred to as the Manual, uses three factors--hydrology, soils, and vegetation--to determine whether wetland conditions are present at any given site.

approach to the vegetation of the Alaskan arctic foothills. Other vegetation analyses of the North American Arctic that have used the Braun-Blanquet approach include unpublished dissertations by Lambert () and Barrett (), and Thannheiser’s (e.g.a,b) cover-age of coastal and wetland vegetation of the Canadian Arctic.

lands, including vegetation, soils, climate and wild- Fish and Wildlife Service has rublished a series of life, that can to some extent be applied to under- "community profiles" that present physical, cherni-standing the management needs for regional wet- cal and biological chararcteristics of wetland eco-lands in Alaska.

Vegetation research at ACCS focuses on the biology of rare and invasive plant species and the distribution, status, and trend of vegetation communities across Alaska. Research on rare and invasive plants includes habitat modeling, biogeography, reproductive ecology and evolution, and ecological impacts of non-native plants.

The dominant plants of the foothills are the sedges and grasses of tussock tundra, a vegetation type that covers some 80 % of arctic Alaska.

Low shrubs, including birches and willows, grow between the tussocks and abundantly along the streams. Nutrients, particularly nitrogen (N), are in short supply and primary productivity low.

A cryogenic soil formed under moist acidic tundra, Toolik Lake Field Research Station, in the Arctic Foothills, Alaska. Note the frost-churned organic matter in upper permafrost at 45–60 cm. Soils formed in high mountain, alpine, and high plateau regions have characteristic morphological features.This guidebook describes a rapid approach to assessing wetlands within the Arctic Foothills and Arctic Coastal Plain (North Slope) region of Alaska.

An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Operational Draft Regional Guidebook for the Rapid Assessment of Wetlands in the North Slope Region of.The vegetation and soil properties on either side of the boundary are similar to those described for MNT and MAT in other studies 8, Site 3 has MNT with 36% cover of non-sorted circles The.